Victorian Architecture, Queen Victoria, and The Book of Kells

On our first day in Ireland my dad and I went to the grocery store. The grocery store is located in the St. Stephens Green Mall. The mall is in a Victorian style.

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queen vVictorian architecture contains turrets, towers, decorative trim, huge windows, bay windows, stairs, and asymmetrical house design.

Victorian architecture dates back to the mid-19th century. It was most popular during the later years of Queen Victoria’s reign.

Queen Victoria was queen from 1837-1901, the second longest reign of any British monarch ever. As a child, she had a gift in drawing and painting. This makes sense to me because Victorian architecture has a lot of intricate designs.
Two days after, my family and I visited The Book of Kells in the Trinity library.

book kellsThe Book of Kells is a gospel book, finished in 384 AD by four major scribes that are unknown. The book was created in Iona, and then moved to Kells. It is a very important relic that helps remind us that we have taken a lot for granted, because we all have it easy.

These days we have paper, made out of trees. Those days they had calfs skin, vellum. Also, we have paint, pens, pencils to use to write and draw. They had to make inks out of things they found in nature, and use a feather for a pen.

The Book of Kells and Queen Victoria don’t seem related in any way, right?

Well, in 1843, Queen Victoria visited Trinity. During her stay, she also saw The Book of Kells. The Queen signed The Book. This upset the Irish, for they hated England, but also because Queen Victoria was saying that all of it was hers. This was incredibly shocking to me. Today our tour-guide explained, that the Book is protected from unwarranted autography and rests, as he put it, in a “queen-proof case.”

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